The Catholic University of America

CUA OXFORD PROGRAM

Dates   |   Description   |  Academics   |    Accommodation    |    Costs    |    Eligibility       How to Apply

 

Dates

Fall 2014 Semester (Michaelmas Term): September 4 - December 16, 2014

Arrival: September 4
Orientation: September 5
Travel Break: September 28-October 4
Travel Break: December 9-16
Departure: December 16

Spring 2015 Semester (Extended Hilary Term): January 8 - April 7, 2015
Arrival: January 8
Orientation: January 9

Travel Break: March 25-April 7
Departure: April 7

Click here for CUA Oxford summer program option


Description

Undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of academic disciplines are offered a once in a lifetime opportunity to apply to CUA's education abroad program at Oxford University in England. This prestigious program is organized locally by the Oxford Programme for Undergraduate Studies (OPUS), and features a variety of custom designed individual tutorials covering topics mostly from the liberal arts and all taught by prominent university scholars. Students are placed in colleges considered among the best in the Oxford university system. Students will live in student housing in and around the center of Oxford.
 

Academics

Fall Semester - Extended Michaelmas Term
When the Fall program begins in late August/early September, students take one three-credit tutorial subject with two or three other students in a small group tutorial setting. This tutorial subject will be selected from the following three options: Shakespeare, C S Lewis, British Politics. After the small group tutorial which lasts approximately 3 weeks in September, students will have a week-long travel break. After the break, students will take two six-credit (two three-credits at the graduate level) traditional Oxford tutorials where they are paired up on an individual basis with Oxford tutors. Choices of subjects can be found on the OPUS website. Students will focus on specific pre-approved area of studies and will be defending essays which they write every week. Tutorials represent a very intensive learning system due to the one-on-one interaction with tutors and the amount of researching, reading and writing involved. The individual tutorials last approximately 8 weeks (October-December). The total coursework for the Fall CUA Oxford program is worth 15 credits for undergraduate students and 9 credits for graduate students.

Spring Semester - Extended Hilary Term
When the Spring program begins in early January, students take two six-credit (two three-credits at the graduate level) traditional Oxford tutorials where they are paired up on an individual basis with Oxford tutors. Choices of subjects can be found on the OPUS website. Students will focus on specific pre-approved area of studies and will be defending essays which they write every week. Tutorials represent a very intensive learning system due to the one-on-one interaction with tutors and the amount of researching, reading and writing involved. After beginning the term with 8 weeks of individual tutorials (January - March), students will then go directly into one three-credit small group tutorial for the following 3 weeks. This tutorial subject will be selected from the following three options: Shakespeare, C S Lewis, or British Politics. A 2-week travel break will follow the small group tutorials before the official program end date. The total coursework for the Spring CUA Oxford program is worth 15 credits for undergraduate students and 9 credits for graduate students.

Oxford tutors may range from Masters students to very senior faculty, but all are excellent and knowledgeable in their fields.  Following are the small group tutorial descriptions to select from provided by OPUS in Oxford:

CS LEWIS (equivalent to ENG 150MTR - 300 level)

CS Lewis was a significant literary author, scholar, theologian, and Christian apologist of the 20th century. Assigned texts are studied and discussed within the wider context of Lewis's works. Literary sessions focus on Lewis as an academic and Oxford figure; the concept of allegory in Lewis's academic work and his children's literature; Lewis's use of fairy tale in the Narnia stories; science fiction and the Cosmic trilogy. Theology/ Apologetics sessions begin with an overview of CS Lewis as a theologian and moral philosopher, putting him in the context of mid-c20th thought in Britain, and in Oxford in particular, and thinking about the theological and philosophical schools that most influenced him. Students read set primary texts (Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, A Grief Observed, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer, The Four Loves), and recommended secondary literature.

SHAKESPEARE (equivalent to ENG 461)

The seminar will examine Shakespeare's growing ability to construct the illusion of reality while reminding us of the artifice of the stage, to draw us into the world of his plays through the power of language, and to explore issues that matter to us, such as love vs. hate, seeming versus being, prejudice versus tolerance, and belief versus unbelief, all under the guise of entertainment. From early comedies and history plays to mature tragedies and romances we will seek to understand and appreciate his artistry even as we wrestle with the serious challenges he poses to our beliefs and assumptions, inviting us to question our own capacity for self-deception and to consider the arguable benefits of honesty, of being "real."
 

BRITISH POLITICS (equivalent to POL 342)
Contemporary British Politics has been dominated by three agenda setting governments which are the primary focus of this course to be conducted over three seminar style tutorials. Firstly the Labour Government 1945 - 51 led by Prime Minister Attlee, in response to massive public demand, enacted a socialist program of nationalisation of industry, the creation of a comprehensive Welfare State, including socialised medicine, and a redistribution of wealth to ensure full employment. These policies formed the basis of the "post-war consensus" much analysed in the scholarly literature. Secondly the Conservative governments 1979 - 97 moved Britain decisively in a different ideological direction led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's desire to privatise industry, reduce inflation, create a flexible labour market, balance the budget and sharply reduce taxes. Accepting these reforms as irreversible led to the third agenda setting government, that of Labour's Tony Blair/Gordon Brown 1997 - 2009. Aside from constitutional and economic policies this period was dominated by the British support for the War on Terror after 9/11, and the controversial 2003 Iraq War, the damaging aftermath of which eventually precipitated Blair's resignation in July 2007. In all, a turbulent and challenging period in British Politics which merits serious study and provides a stimulating intellectual challenge.

All students, even graduate students, will be assigned to the Junior Common Room (JCR) at their college. It may be possible for grad students to gain access to the Masters Common Room (MCR) if available, but this cannot be guaranteed.

 

Accommodation

Housing is of a good basic British standard, located within a ten minute bus or bicycle ride from the city center or a 20-25 minute walk. Please keep in mind that British and American standards are very different and British housing might seem sub-standard to you in terms of comfort, proximity and convenience. Each student will have a single room (double rooms are not common in Oxford) and share a lounge, bathroom, and kitchen with other students on the program. All houses are well-equipped and include bed linen, kitchen utensils and one working phone for incoming calls only. Students will have the opportunity to purchase or rent "pay-as-you-go" cell phones while in Oxford. All housing locations will have a printer and the option for high-speed wireless internet. Higher grade housing on account of its quality or location may be requested on the housing form but it cannot be guaranteed. This carries a small supplement which is payable in Oxford

Higher grade housing now includes a limited number of rooms in a college house which is not on the main college site but in a development owned by the college and used to house its undergraduate and graduate students. Rooms in college are rarely available and do not include cooking facilities; rooms in college houses are further away but are usually more comfortable and include cooking facilities. There is very limited availability of either category of college accommodation. Placements will take into account academic standing, college assignment, and other criteria.

Program fees include tuition, housing, utility payments (electricity, heating, and water), and phone line rental (for which you may be required to submit a refundable deposit). Housing supplements payable for optional higher grade housing are not included.

There is no "University campus" in Oxford as the colleges, departments, lecture rooms, and tutorial venues are spread throughout the city. Wherever students live, there will be some travel involved (by bike or by bus, or on foot). The distance of most OPUS properties is generally 15-20 minutes walking time from the city center.

All participants must bring a laptop with them to Oxford.

 

Programs Costs

Application Fee: $100 non-refundable, due at the time of application

Program Cost:

  • CUA Semester Tuition
  • $5,000 Program Fee

A $1,000 non-refundable deposit is due upon acceptance and applicable toward the program fee. CUA tuition and balance of program fee is charged to the student's CUA student account.

What's Included

  • Full-time tuition in the form of tutorials
  • Pre-departure CUA orientation & in-country orientation
  • Single room housing
  • Cell phone rental (students pay usage fees)
  • Membership in Oxford college
  • Membership in the Bodlein library
  • Membership in the Union Society
  • Some weekend trips & special events
  • Emergency evacuation coverage

Airfare, meals, any supplemental housing fees, passport, and books are not included and are the responsibility of the student who should budget appropriately. Please contact CUAbroad for the complete cost breakdown of the program.

View the CUAbroad Cancellation and Withdrawal Policy

CUAbroad reserves the right to make changes and raise the program cost in light of currency fluctuations or any other unforeseen circumstance.

 

Eligibility

Applicants must have completed at least 45 credits at the time of departure and have a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA at the undergraduate level and 3.8 cumulative GPA at the graduate level. Students should not study abroad the last semester of their senior year if they are concerned about graduating on time.

 

After Acceptance

Students are not allowed to work on a UK student visa.

 

Contact

CUAbroad
cua-cuabroad@cua.edu
111 McMahon Hall
202-319-6010

 

Information Session

Fridays at 2 p.m.
McMahon 111
 

Application Deadline

Fall Semester:

  • March 1

Spring Semester:

  • October 1

Please note that only a select number of placements are available each semester so apply early!

 

Student Blogs

Read about the day-to-day adventures of students who are currently studying at Oxford. 

 

Ask a Student

Read about the experiences of students who have studied in Oxford and contact them with any questions.

 

Radcliffe Camera in OxfordHistoric center of Oxford

 map of England